CRYOPRESERVATION OF HUMAN EMBRYOS AND REPRODUCTIVE CELLS: The Legal Loopholes [EDITORIAL]

-by Ramsha Reyaz Cryopreservation is the process of freezing biological specimens like cells, tissues, organelles etc. at very low temperatures for the purpose of preservation. Cryopreserved cells can remain viable for long periods of time and, therefore, the process is increasingly being used for preserving reproductive cells and fertilized embryos as part of in-vitro fertilization and other assisted reproductive techniques. Cryopreservation is an important aspect … Continue reading CRYOPRESERVATION OF HUMAN EMBRYOS AND REPRODUCTIVE CELLS: The Legal Loopholes [EDITORIAL]

Food

THE VIRUS OF HUNGER: Contextualizing Food Security in Times of COVID-19: PART-II

This article aims to contextualize the debate around food security in India considering the COVID-19 pandemic. It analyses historical and economic arguments for policy initiatives and aims to make suggestions regarding the state’s role in handling the crisis. By analysing state action through famine relief in colonial India, the article aims to locate the state’s responsibility in the current crisis. Continue reading THE VIRUS OF HUNGER: Contextualizing Food Security in Times of COVID-19: PART-II

Food

THE VIRUS OF HUNGER: Contextualising Food Security In Times of COVID-19: PART-I

This article aims to contextualize the debate around food security in India considering the COVID-19 pandemic. It analyses historical and economic arguments for policy initiatives and aims to make suggestions regarding the state’s role in handling the crisis. By analysing state action through famine relief in colonial India, the article aims to locate the state’s responsibility in the current crisis. Continue reading THE VIRUS OF HUNGER: Contextualising Food Security In Times of COVID-19: PART-I

Competition

Concerted Action vs Unilateral Conduct in Competition Law: A Critique – PART II

A concerted action perpetuated by various persons or enterprises is different from the unilateral conduct of an individual entity, as the latter is not accompanied with the element of “concurrence of wills”. That is why Section 3 and 4 of the Competition Act, 2002 are different in their scope and operation.The second part of the article comprehensively discusses the case of Mahyco Monsanto Biotech (India) Limited and argues that, despite a statutory distinction, the approach undertaken by the Competition Commission of India has resulted in conflation of the paradigms used to assess anti-competitive agreements with those relating to the abuse of dominance. Continue reading Concerted Action vs Unilateral Conduct in Competition Law: A Critique – PART II